How to deal with being disinherited by a stepparent

This is a real-life case study of a stepparent inheritance claim we have successfully concluded on a no win, no fee basis. For expert guidance on how to deal with being disinherited by a stepparent call our free legal helpline on 0808 139 1606 or send details of your case to us by email at [email protected]

Disinherited by a stepparent? Are you entitled to claim?

Our inheritance team are regularly contacted by stepchildren who have been disinherited by a stepparent. One particularly common situation is where a stepparent goes back on an agreement that has previously been reached with a biological parent and changes their will after that parent has died.

In this case our client’s mother had promised him that he would receive an inheritance and made mirror wills with his stepfather. These wills ensured that he would receive his inheritance after they had both died.
His mother died first, and the stepfather inherited. However, the stepfather then changed his will, thereby disinheriting our client.

Couples often assume that mirror wills are binding even after one of them dies, but this is not the case. Mirror wills can be revoked at any time and there is nothing to stop the surviving partner from making an entirely different will, irrespective of any agreement reached with their late partner.

Our client felt that his stepfather’s actions were unfair and went against his mother’s specific wishes. He had been counting on the money. Health issues and then the pandemic had severely impacted on his financial wellbeing.

This was made worse when he caught Covid-19 and suffered symptoms of ‘long Covid’. It was therefore a major blow when he discovered he had been disinherited.
He turned to us for help and we agreed to take on his inheritance claim, working on a no win, no fee basis.

We presented the claim to the stepfather’s estate and made an offer to settle the case out of court on the basis of what our client would have received if the mirror will had not been revoked.

Our offer was accepted and accordingly our client received the inheritance he had been promised by his mother.

He was very pleased with the outcome, commenting that our well executed approach had paid off perfectly.

You can read more about the inheritance rights of stepchildren here.

If you have been disinherited by a stepparent and would like to know where you stand then contact us today for a free assessment.

Hayley Bundey

Hayley Bundey

Hayley joined Slee Blackwell in 2008 initially as a paralegal before training and qualifying as a Solicitor with the firm in 2011. She has specialised in Contentious Probate throughout her career and has extensive experience in all areas of Contentious Probate work, including claims under the Inheritance Act, challenges to the validity of wills, trust & executor disputes and beneficial interest claims involving proprietary estoppel.
Hayley Bundey

Hayley Bundey

Hayley joined Slee Blackwell in 2008 initially as a paralegal before training and qualifying as a Solicitor with the firm in 2011. She has specialised in Contentious Probate throughout her career and has extensive experience in all areas of Contentious Probate work, including claims under the Inheritance Act, challenges to the validity of wills, trust & executor disputes and beneficial interest claims involving proprietary estoppel.

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Call the Slee Blackwell helpline on 0808 139 1606